How to Locate Experts Willing to Collaborate with Students in your WebQuest

Method #1: "Ask an Expert" Web Sites
One of the most impressive educational uses of the Internet is the wide variety of Ask an Expert web sites now available. At these sites, students can contact adult experts in every imaginable field of expertise, and will often get a response back within a day or two.

Pitsco's Ask and Expert
http://www.askanexpert.com/
This is one of the best Ask an Expert Sites. A great starting point, this site can put you in contact with hundreds of experts in every imaginable cetegory!

NJ NIE Project: Ask an Expert Site
http://njnie.dl.stevens-tech.edu/curriculum/aska.html
A very good starting point, with links to lots of Ask an Expert sites. These are divided by subject area.

Community Learning Network: Ask an Expert Sources
http://www.cln.org/int_expert.html
Another good starting point. The sites are divided by subject area.

There are MANY more Ask an Expert sites. Try doing a search with your favorite search engine!

Method #2: Use people in your local area
If your WebQuest involves a problem that is of local concern, or if there are experts in your area that could provide the feedback your students need, why not use them?

Local areas to consider:

If these people have an interest in helping out, and if they use email on a regular basis, they would be perfect for this!

Method #3: Submit a request to an email discussion group (listserv)
If you are a member of one or more education-related listserv, why not post a request for experts willing to collaborate with your students? Many of the teachers on educational listservs have extensive experience in a variety of areas. And they all have an interest in education!

Method #4: Locate web sites that are relevant to your topic and email a request to the author(s) of the site
You have already located numerous web sites related to your WebQuest topic most of them were written by experts in the area of interest. Most web sites have an "email link" at the bottom. Simply email the authors and ask them if they would be willing to correspond with your students as they work on the WebQuest. It never hurts to ask!